Cyanide and Insomnia
ancient-serpent:

Victorian velvet “gentleman’s chair” from about 1888

ancient-serpent:

Victorian velvet “gentleman’s chair” from about 1888

depressioncomix:

depressioncomix:

191

Commentary time. This strip hits a bit home for me because depression has made me stumble quite a few times in life, and every time I’ve stumbled I fell behind a little more. Soon, I’ve fallen so far behind that I can’t even see the same people I was in the race with. There’s a lot to this metaphor, and I feel it all the time. Almost any meeting of friends reminds me of how I’ve fallen behind, and I never read facebook because seeing everyone ahead of me in the race is so discouraging.
I guess if anything can be taken from this strip is theimportance of getting help as quickly as possible, as any lost time to depression is forever gone. It puts your life on standby while everyone else’s is still going on. And the more time you spend in depression limbo makes it difficult to get back.
This is a really negative post, I’m sorry. But this is depression comix.

depressioncomix:

depressioncomix:

191

Commentary time. This strip hits a bit home for me because depression has made me stumble quite a few times in life, and every time I’ve stumbled I fell behind a little more. Soon, I’ve fallen so far behind that I can’t even see the same people I was in the race with. There’s a lot to this metaphor, and I feel it all the time. Almost any meeting of friends reminds me of how I’ve fallen behind, and I never read facebook because seeing everyone ahead of me in the race is so discouraging.

I guess if anything can be taken from this strip is theimportance of getting help as quickly as possible, as any lost time to depression is forever gone. It puts your life on standby while everyone else’s is still going on. And the more time you spend in depression limbo makes it difficult to get back.

This is a really negative post, I’m sorry. But this is depression comix.

windkonig:

all aboard the BONE TRAIN

eisuverse:

mattahan:

Cannot be stressed enough.

Will always reblog this. This is from SKOTTIE YOUNG. You don’t play with that shizt yo!

displacedmun:

sassadilla:

the best condoms money can buy

Make sure your onion has layers.

displacedmun:

sassadilla:

the best condoms money can buy

Make sure your onion has layers.

oceanplait:

superwholockey:

tanzanator:

bookworm-for-life:



Limits of the Human Body by Soda Pop Avenue


I am a writer I say as I reblog this

i am an a R TIST

FUCK THIS I’M A MURDERER

Hey, I just like to know my limits.

oceanplait:

superwholockey:

tanzanator:

bookworm-for-life:

Limits of the Human Body by Soda Pop Avenue

I am a writer I say as I reblog this

i am an a R TIST

FUCK THIS I’M A MURDERER

Hey, I just like to know my limits.
i am now the proud owner of a suggestive cabbage

i am now the proud owner of a suggestive cabbage

glitchcube:

((JESUS CHRIST THE AMOUNT OF NOTES! IM GONNA DIE! THANK YOU SO MUCH! óuò))

Hi Tom!! I'm a digital animation student and I was wondering if you have any tips for getting a job at Disney. That's kind of one of my lifetime goals. I would absolutely love to hear back from you! --Shey

tombancroft1:

Hey Shey.  Sorry for this late reply, I just saw I had messages.  I get this question a lot.  ”Do you have a TIP on how I get into Disney as an animator/character designer/concept artist- its my dream”.  

I’m answering you, but posting this for all to see.  

(NOTE: Shey, ignore any snarky-ness in my tone, you don’t deserve it and seem like a very nice person.  This is a global answer since I’m posting it and not necessarily directed toward you.   I just get this question A LOT and, hopefully unlike yourself, by people that just want to dream it; not work for it.)  

First of all, when you ask someone that question, you really should have your portfolio in your hand and have JUST SHOWN that person it.  Without that, I truly am just giving you the most general of answers.  That said, you just want a “tip” on how to do it?  The easy answer is to Google search it and most likely you’ll end up at Disney animation’s website where I assume (I’ve never looked) they probably have some instructions on how to submit your portfolio online and (hopefully) an idea of what they want you to have in it.  That’s a tip.  

But here’s the honest answer and its a bit more than a tip.  The real question you should be asking is, “What do i need to do to make it as a professional artist at one of the biggest/oldest/ most respected/ competitive animation studios in the world?”  I’ll be even more direct: by not even knowing what you are REALLY asking, it tells me you’re not ready.  The person asking how to become what took me 25 years and looking for a “tip” for an answer has a long way to go to understand the competitive effort and strong work ethic needed to make it at a major animation studio, much less get that first entry level job as an artist.  First, take an honest look at your work and compare it to PROs.  Not your peers.  Not your Deviant Art followers, your parents, siblings, or high school friends- but compare it to the people’s work who’s JOB you want to take away.  Sounds tough, right?  At many studios, that’s what it comes down to: Someone has to leave for a job to be open, so there’s some truth to it.  But that mentality of  looking at your ARTISTIC HEROES as your competition will give you a good sense to what you are up against.  The best of the best.  Yes, there are entry-level positions at most of the studios, but you don’t want that.  You want to jump past that and be an animator, character designer, concept artist.  Not a storyboard revisionist.  Not an intern.  Maybe you’ll take those positions to get your foot in the door?  Good, because that’s all you’re gonna get offered to you.  Even if you draw like the teen version of Glen Keane (if you don’t know who he is then you’re also showing how “not ready” you are) you still don’t have that precious commodity that producers put equal weight on: Experience.   So, buckle down remember you’re young still (unlike me) and do the work needed and expect an entry level position for all that hard work.  It’s fact.  How long you stay in that entry level position is where you’re ability will pay off though.  Some climb high and fast.  Others, their whole career is a struggle.  Hard work can make a difference, but I believe there is a mysterious “A” gene that is a bit bigger in some people’s DNA than most.  And that “A” stands for “Ability”.  

I can shorten it to a TIP though: DRAW EVERY DAY.  

I know I sound like a crodgity-old man (and part of me is) but know that I am answering this question not for you, but for ALL the people that have asked it.  BUT- even more importantly- know that I’m ALSO not answering this just for me but for all the other artist pros that have been asked it.  Listen to these words:  Wake up.  Quite dreaming and start WORKING.

You’ll have my job in no time. :)